Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 2 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 3 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

Warning: Missing argument 4 for deo_embed_responsive_video(), called in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287 and defined in /home/kocheredwin/planete-coree.com/wp-content/themes/furosa/includes/theme-functions.php on line 146

L’appellation « danses folkloriques » désigne aussi bien les danses populaires et communautaires (sorich’um, nongakch’um et t’alch’um), que les danses  rituelles, chamaniques et bouddhiques (Salp’urichum, Sŭngmu et T’aepyŏngmu) exécutées par des artistes professionnels [1].

Les danses dites populaires sont de simples danses collectives dotées de traits locaux distincts et de couleurs régionales particulières, ayant pour origine des rites chamaniques ou agricoles. Pratiquées en plein air, elles étaient profondément liées à la vie quotidienne, aux récoltes et à diverses célébrations. Ce n’étaient pas des danses professionnelles, même si elles ont pu le devenir au fil du temps. Interprétées par des danseurs et des kisaeng (기생), voire des acrobates, elles ont progressivement perdu leur signification religieuse et ont été raffinées et stylisées pour les arts de la scène.

Appliqués aux danses folkloriques, les qualificatifs « populaire » ou « professionnel » comportent donc un certain nombre d’ambiguïtés et, du fait de l’évolution complexe des arts vivants coréens depuis la fin de l’ère Chŏson, il est parfois difficile de faire la distinction entre ces deux catégories, auxquelles s’ajoute une troisième, celle des danses dites improvisées. On les appelle hŏt’ŭnch’um [2], pour signifier qu’elles peuvent être interprétées par tout un chacun, même si elles requièrent une certaine habileté.

Enfin, au début du 20e siècle, certaines danses de cour réinterprétées pour des chorégraphies en intérieur dans les maisons de kisaeng, ont pu rejoindre le vaste répertoire des danses folkloriques (Chinju-Kŏmmu et Sŭngjŏn-mu).

1. Danses chorales : Kanggang-sullae


Les sorich’um (소리춤) sont des danses exécutées en cercle ou en ligne, avec un accompagnement vocal mais sans percussions, à la différence de Nongakch’um. Exécutées plus fréquemment par les femmes que les hommes – phénomène assez rare au regard de l’ensemble des rites saisonniers coréens [3] – elles stimulent le travail manuel et s’intègrent dans des célébrations rituelles et agricoles. Kanggang-suwŏllae (강강술래), originaire de la province sud du Chŏlla, est exclusivement féminine. Kanggang désigne le « rond » ou le « cercle » et suwŏllae ou sullae signifie « tourner », dans le dialecte régional, et la danse accompagne le chant éponyme. Cette appellation s’inspire également d’un jeu d’enfant, sullaejagbi (술래잡기): les enfants s’asseyaient en cercle jusqu’à ce que le « sullae » laisse discrètement tomber un mouchoir dans le dos d’un d’entre eux, mouvement que l’on retrouve dans Kanggang-suwŏllae.

Kanggang-sullae (강강술래)
ⓒ 류재정
Source : http://encykorea.aks.ac.kr/Contents/Item/E0000958

Cette danse se déroule traditionnellement le 15 du  premier et du huitième mois lunaires, à l’occasion de Ch’usŏk (추석), fête des récoltes de la pleine lune [4]. Les jeunes filles du village revêtent un costume traditionnel et se tressent les cheveux avant de se rassembler dans un champ pour former une ronde, à l’image d’une lune terrestre. Au cours de cette danse énergique, le chant peut être improvisé et ne s’interrompt jamais. Les paroles évoquent l’amour, la longévité, le bonheur ainsi que des scènes typiques de la vie domestique [5], tandis que les mouvements adressent une prière ou un remerciement aux esprits bienfaiteurs pour une bonne récolte ou une bonne pêche. Au son d’un appel en solo et d’une réponse chorale (« Kanggangsullae »), les jeunes filles se déplacent lentement en cercle, et accélèrent au fur et à mesure pour achever la danse au pas de course [6]. Elles s’assemblent en plus de douze formations différentes (chinbŏp-nori 진법놀이), dont certaines sont identiques à celles de Nongakch’um. Quand elles se fatiguent, elles font une pause puis reprennent la danse.

Kanggang-sullae (강강술래)
ⓒ Arirang TV
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtXMvWOzwI4

Cette danse est une récréation permettant aux jeunes filles de rire et de s’amuser, de danser et de chanter, mais à l’origine elle exprimait une prière ou une marque de gratitude, comme toutes les danses coréennes dont la fonction première est religieuse. Kanggang-suwŏllae remonterait au début de la période des Trois Royaumes et son origine figurerait dans un document de Mahan (aujourd’hui province du Chŏlla). Les archives relatent que des danses similaires étaient interprétées lors d’un grand festival appelé Kip’ungjae (기풍재, prières pour une bonne récolte) tenu lors du cinquième mois lunaire pour célébrer les semis et les récoltes, et aussi pendant le dixième mois lunaire pour la récolte d’automne. Mais cette danse emblématique pouvait aussi se dérouler n’importe quel soir de pleine lune pour célébrer la victoire de la lumière sur les ténèbres [7].

Kanggang-sullae (강강술래)
© 2004 by National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/ganggangsullae-00188

Kanggang-suwŏllae aurait également des origines militaires. On rapporte en effet que l’amiral Yi Sun-shin l’employa comme tactique pour contrer l’invasion japonaise de la fin du 16e siècle [8]. Comme il n’y avait pas assez d’hommes pour barrer la route aux Nippons, les femmes se vêtirent en soldats et prirent position avec les hommes au sommet de la colline. Lorsque l’ennemi s’approcha de nuit, il confondit le mouvement circulaire de la danse avec les manœuvres d’une très grande troupe et se retira promptement. 

Kanggang-suwŏllae a été désignée Trésor culturel immatériel n° 8 par le gouvernement sud-coréen.  Elle a également été inscrite sur la Liste représentative de l’Unesco en 2009.

2. Danses agricoles : Nongakch’um

Nongakch’um (농악춤) est un spectacle de type madang-nori (마당놀이), où performances traditionnelles chantées et dansées se déroulent en plein air [9].

Fonctions et temporalité

Musique et danse renforcent les liens entre les membres d’une communauté (ture, 두레) au cours des processions et rites agricoles, durant les périodes de dur labeur et lors des festivals villageois. Elles permettent de soulager la fatigue et d’accroître l’efficacité, et Nongakch’um reproduit les gestes du travail agraire : le labour, les semailles, le désherbage, le repiquage, le transport de lourds fardeaux, l’affûtage des faucilles, la récolte, le décorticage et la mouture du riz, ainsi que la fabrication de cordes et d’objets en paille [10].

Orchestre agricole de Damyang, Hwanggŭm-ri, province du Chŏlla.
© 2007 by Kim Hyeo-jeong
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

Etroitement lié à l’agriculture qui était fondamentale pour l’économie du pays, le nongak jouait un rôle essentiel dans les célébrations nationales coréennes, et on l’exécutait à l’occasion de congés ou de fêtes importantes :  

– Le 15 janvier du calendrier lunaire, pour célébrer Sŏllal (설날) et prier pour la prospérité et pour de bonnes récoltes.
– En mai, au moment où l’on plante le riz, et en juin, lorsque l’on désherbe.
– Le 15 juin du calendrier lunaire, après le désherbage, pour se détendre : c’est le jour des agriculteurs.
– Le 15 août du calendrier lunaire, jour du Festival de la lune, considéré comme un bon augure.
– En automne, au moment de la récolte, pour fêter la fin de l’année agricole [11].

En été, lors du désherbage, les agriculteurs étaient appelés par le ching pour prendre leur faux et se rassembler à l’entrée du village sous une banderole proclamant : « L’agriculture est la fondation du monde » [12]. Puis ils prenaient la direction des champs, stimulés par le kkwaenggwari, le ching, le changgu, le puk et le t’aep’yŏngso et travaillaient en chantant.

Pendant la récolte d’automne, les kŏllipp’ae (걸립패, troupes professionnelles levant des fonds) visitaient chaque village et chaque foyer, jouant le nongak pour attirer la bonne fortune et étaient payés de riz en retour. Ces groupes chamanistes itinérants invoquaient la divinité tutélaire du village, demandaient la bénédiction des esprits et chassaient les entités maléfiques (kwisin,귀신). Ils pouvaient aussi solliciter des dons pour des œuvres collectives telles que la restauration d’un temple bouddhiste.

Nongak de Kurye Chansu, levée de fonds pour des projets communautaires, village de Sinchon (Chansu), province du Chŏlla
© 2008 by Kim Hyeo-jeong
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

La composition de la troupe

Encore aujourd’hui, ce spectacle est interprété la plupart du temps par 16 interprètes, musiciens et danseurs. Le groupe fait son entrée en procession, en portant un petit drapeau orné d’un dragon (yongdanggi, 용당기), une paire de drapeaux (yŏnggi, 영기), ainsi qu’un mât couronné de plumes de faisan et d’un grand drapeau blanc (nonggi, 농기) portant l’inscription « L’agriculture est la fondation du monde ». Pendant qu’ils jouent et dansent, les artistes engagent un dialogue humoristique et échangent des plaisanteries très appréciées des spectateurs.

Tournée des maisons du village pour chasser les esprits maléfiques et apporter la chance.
Imsil Pilbong nongak du Chŏlla du nord.
© 2013 by Kim Hyeo-jeong
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

Le sang-soe (상쇠), premier joueur de kkwaenggwari, est le meneur de jeu : il porte une ceinture de couleur et un pup’o-sangmo (부포상모), chapeau dont le pompon pivote au rythme de la danse. L’orchestre est toujours concentré sur ses gestes et son jeu instrumental, car il dirige les changements [13]. Les swaejabi , ou joueurs de kkwaenggwari et de ching, portent également un pup’o-sangmo ou un ch’ae-sangmo (체상모, chapeau avec un long ruban)[14], tandis que d’autres membres de la troupe sont coiffés de capuchons pointus ornés de pompons colorés (kokkal, 고깔). Le premier joueur de changgu (su-changgu, 수장구) porte un large chapeau recouvrant partiellement son visage. L’orchestre comprend encore deux autres joueurs de changgu associés au joueur de puk, et huit joueurs de sogo. Ce sont ces derniers qui exécutent des acrobaties et des pirouettes en jouant du tambour à main et en faisant voltiger les longs rubans fixés au centre de leur chapeau. D’autres musiciens peuvent aussi se joindre à la troupe : des joueurs de t’aep’yŏngso (태평소) ou hojŏk (호적), ainsi que de haegŭm (해금, sorte de violon)[15].

Acrobaties (yŏnp’ungdae,연풍대) exécutées par la troupe féminine du Nongak de Kurye.
© 2011 by Kim Hyeo-jeong
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

Les performances dansées

La « danse du drapeau », en ouverture, est la version popularisée d’une danse en solo d’origine chamanique, avec des costumes inspirés de ceux de la cour des Tang [16]. Le motif du drapeau et la formation bigarrée du groupe évoquent des fleurs en train d’éclore, de se refermer ou de pivoter, mais aussi des ailes de papillon ainsi que des vagues. Bien que certains musiciens portent un chapeau orné de fleurs en papier d’inspiration bouddhiste (kokkal), cette danse est issue d’un kut (굿) et  s’est ensuite développée sous la forme d’une danse chorale [17].

Nongak © UNESCO
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

Le sang-soe interprète Pup’onorich’um (부포놀이춤), danse du pompon de plumes de grue, en agitant la tête pour ouvrir et refermer le pup’o. Il capte ainsi l’attention des spectateurs et leur fait ressentir le rythme, ce qui demande force talents. Il imite également le mouvement d’un oiseau attrapant de la nourriture ou s’ébrouant, et la délicatesse du jeu de jambes et les subtils mouvements de la tête contrastent avec les sonorités métalliques des kkwaenggwari. Le pup’o, qui servait de signal dans l’armée, a une origine martiale, comme le chapeau et comme certaines injonctions de l’orchestre nongak [18] : « Frappez le ching pour signaler la fin d’une formation » ou « Mobilisez les soldats ». De fait, le nongak pouvait aussi accompagner la marche militaire pour encourager les troupes au combat.

P’yŏngt’aek Nongak (평택 농악), Patrimoine culturel immatériel n°11-2
© Park Sungbok de Pyeongtaek Photobank – Memory in Pyeongtaek
Source : http://www.korea.net/NewsFocus/Culture/view?articleId=123313

Ainsi, au rythme du meneur, les danseurs sautent et courent en cercle, avec une énergie et une exubérance constantes. Chacun joue et danse en solo avec son propre instrument : ces performances s’intitulent Sangmonorich’um (상모놀이춤), Sŏljangguch’um (설장구춤), Pukch’um (북춤), Hŏt’ŭnch’um (허튼춤) et Sawich’um (사외춤)[19]. Puis tous se rassemblent pour former un cercle au centre duquel les jeunes garçons dessinent des volutes avec le long ruban de leur chapeau, en agitant la tête, en s’inclinant et en se redressant. Cette performance intitulée Sogoch’um (소고춤)[20] constitue le point d’orgue du spectacle avec la forme Ch’aesang-sogoch’um (체상소고춤) qui requiert un grand talent et un sens parfait du rythme, car le mouvement du ruban doit être fluide et ininterrompu durant la performance de sogo. Certains mouvements sont issus de manœuvres de défense ou de signaux militaires, tandis que d’autres imitent les travaux agricoles. Durant la performance, les danseurs brandissent le sogo dans plusieurs directions, le soulèvent, le font tourner et l’apportent à la poitrine. Le spectacle monte en puissance avec les acrobaties (yŏnp’ungdae,연풍대) et les sauts vrillés (chaban-twijibgi , 자반뒤집기). A cela s’ajoutent d’autres prouesses : le danseur enroule le ruban en fléchissant les genoux et en battant du tambour, puis il fait voltiger le ruban en spirales vers la gauche et vers la droite avant de s’asseoir doucement sur une percussion de sogo. Ce sont les mouvements les plus dynamiques des danses coréennes, et le long ruban est comme une extension du corps avec lequel il dessine une  ligne continue. Les rythmes puissants et complexes de la musique sont frénétiques et entraînants, et suscitent le hŭng (흥). Autrefois interprétée uniquement par des hommes, cette danse est devenue mixte [21].

Les formations du Nongakch’um sont aussi très variées [22]. Le groupe peut dessiner une ligne puis se déployer progressivement en cercle ou l’inverse. Puis les danseurs se divisent en cinq groupes en direction des points cardinaux (nord, sud, est, ouest et centre) et tournent en petits cercles. Ils peuvent aussi exécuter une formation en S, un déplacement en crabe ou en ciseaux, ou encore se ranger en ligne et passer sous l’arche formée par les deux drapeaux yŏnggi (sŏngmun yŏlgi, 성문열기, litt. « ouvrir la porte du château »). Au cours de ces diverses chorégraphies, chacun déploie ses talents individuels et lorsque la dernière performance intitulée Mudong-nori (무동놀이, danse des jeunes garçons) s’achève, la comédie peut commencer .

Ssangomudong de Pyŏngtaek, Kyŏnggi, au centre de la péninsule – Omudong (오무동) désigne la pyramide humaine formée par cinq personnes.  Ssangomudong (쌍모무동) veut dire que cette pyramide est double.
© 2013 by Kim Hyeo-jeong
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

Les mimes

Des mimes bariolés appelés chapsaek (잡색) interprètent une pièce [23]. Les personnages principaux sont un yangban (양반), coiffé d’un kat (갓, chapeau en crins de cheval) et vêtu d’un top’o (도포, manteau long avec des manches carrées), qui se déplace lentement avec un éventail à la main ; un chasseur (taep’osu) qui porte un chapeau en laine, un sac à dos, un fusil et un faisan à la ceinture ; un moine (chung) ; un homme travesti en femme (waejangnyŏ) avec une robe (ch’ima-chŏgori, 치마저고리), une serviette autour de la tête et un mouchoir à la main ; et un enfant qui danse sur les épaules d’un homme. En fonction des régions, d’autres protagonistes (un moinillon, un bossu, un lion et un singe) peuvent s’ajouter au répertoire.

P’yŏngt’aek Nongak (평택 농악), Patrimoine culturel immatériel n°11-2
© Park Sungbok de Pyeongtaek Photobank – Memory in Pyeongtaek
Source : http://www.korea.net/NewsFocus/Culture/view?articleId=123313

Les comédiens se rendent auprès du sŏnangdang (서낭당) puis font le tour des maisons du village. A la nuit tombée, pour divertir les habitants, ils jouent un p’an-kut sur la place du village devant un grand feu, avec un vaste répertoire : mime, théâtre, et farces [24].


Rite Tangsanje de Imsil Pilbong. Le nongak est interprété durant le culte rendu au dieu gardien du village, à la première pleine lune de l’année.
© 2013 by Kim Hyeo-jeong
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-nongak-groupes-de-musique-danse-et-rituels-communautaires-de-la-republique-de-coree-00717

Le Namsadang-nori (남사당놀이)

Selon Kim Yang-gon, les festivités du nongak évoluèrent sous l’influence des namsadangp’ae à l’ère Koryŏ. Ces troupes vagabondes, qui parcouraient le pays pour gagner leur pain avec des chants, des danses et des acrobaties, exécutaient des tours originaires des Tartares de la Mandchourie du nord et d’Asie centrale. Mais elles encouraient aussi les villageois à la licence : les femmes (yŏsadang, 여사당) exerçaient la prostitution, tandis que les hommes (namsadang, 남사당) pratiquaient la sodomie [25]. Le gouvernement régula le comportement de ces artistes nomades en les obligeant à s’installer dans des refuges de villages, où ils se sédentarisèrent progressivement en tant qu’agriculteurs. C’est ainsi que leurs prouesses, hautes en couleurs, furent intégrées dans le répertoire du nongak, à savoir : la Mudong-ch’um, pyramide formée de quatre ou cinq hommes au sommet de laquelle un garçon travesti en fille ondule gracieusement des bras et des épaules ; la danse du ch’aesangmo ; et enfin le tour d’assiette en équilibre au bout d’une pique ou d’un bâton en bambou (pŏna, 버나).

Namsadang-nori (남사당놀이)
© UNESCO
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-namsadang-nori-00184

Ces performances témoigneraient d’une influence mongole sur les Coréens, identifiée à l’ère Koryŏ : vogue des divertissements d’Asie du nord et des fêtes acrobatiques de Yüan, et adoption de coiffures et de vêtements d’origine mongole, dont proviendraient les ceintures et le sangmo du nongak.

L’ensemble des spectacles du Namsadang-nori (littéralement « théâtre de clowns itinérants masculins »)[26], a été reconnu comme Trésor culturel immatériel n°3 par la République de Corée en 1964, puis classé sur la Liste représentative du patrimoine culturel immatériel de l’UNESCO en 2009.


Variantes régionales

Avec la disparition progressive des kŏllipp’ae, le nongak a été interprété parmi d’autres spectacles, et ses formes varient légèrement en fonction des régions, dans les provinces du Kyŏnggi (경기, aux environs de Séoul), du Chŏlla (전라), du Kyŏngsang (경상), du Ch’ungch’ŏng (충청) et du Kangwŏn (강원). Les schémas rythmiques (soe-karak, 쇠가락) obéissent, selon les cas, à des tempos modérés ou rapides [27].

Les provinces de la Corée du Sud. Carte réalisée par l’Université de Laval, Québec, Canada.
© Université de Laval
Source :
http://www.axl.cefan.ulaval.ca/asie/coree-sud-prov.htm

Dans le nongak du Kyŏnggi, le t’aep’yŏngso suit le rythme sinawi, et l’une des danses est interprétée par trois ou quatre jeunes enfants juchés sur les épaules d’adultes. Ils ondulent du buste, des bras et des mains, avant d’être lancés et rattrapés par d’autres adultes qui les installent à leur tour sur leurs épaules. Et le spectacle s’achève sur les volutes des sangmo.

Dans le nongak du Chŏlla, les variations rythmiques du kkwaenggwari jouent un rôle essentiel et les musiciens portent l’habit traditionnel : paji chŏgori (바지, pantalon bouffant et저고리, veste ajustée) avec les chipsin (짚신, chaussures tressées en paille de riz).

Chipsin (짚신), chaussures tressées en paille de riz.
© Folkency (Encyclopedia of Korean folk culture)
Source : http://folkency.nfm.go.kr/kr/topic/detail/7195

Dans le nongak du Kangwŏn, les rythmes du kkwaenggwari sont moins variés et les performances collectives et individuelles sont moins complexes. Trait caractéristique régional, des fleurs en papier coloré sont accrochées aux pompons des chapeaux.

Dans le nongak du Kyŏngsang, on observe au sud une grande variété de danses et de rythmes pour le kkwaenggwari, tandis qu’au nord les danses sont militaires et suivent des rythmes moins complexes. Dans les premiers temps, les porteurs de drapeau revêtaient l’habit militaire et les joueurs formaient des rangées parallèles, avançant et reculant au signal des drapeaux, et marchant les uns contre les autres comme dans une bataille. 

P’yŏngt’aek Nongak (평택 농악), Patrimoine culturel immatériel n°11-2 © Park Sungbok de Pyeongtaek Photobank – Memory in Pyeongtaek
Source : http://www.korea.net/NewsFocus/Culture/view?articleId=123313

Selon Kim Yang-gon, il y a eu de fréquents concours de danses folkloriques depuis la Libération en 1945, et la rencontre de troupes de localités diverses a pu faire disparaître les traits locaux dans les années 1960. A présent l’ensemble du répertoire inclut les volutes du sangmo ainsi que la Mudong-ch’um, et la banderole doit être de la taille du danseur [28].

Patrimonialisation du nongak

Le nongak sipich’a (농악십이차, douze mouvements de la musique agricole) a été enregistré comme Trésor culturel immatériel n°11 en 1966. Dès lors, cinq formes de nongak ont été reconnues par le gouvernement sud-coréen, en vue de leur préservation, entre les années 1960 et les années 1980 [29] : Chinju Samch’ŏnpo nongak dans le Kyŏngsang du sud en 1966 ; P’yŏngt’aek nongak dans le Kyŏnggi en 1985 ; Iri nongak dans le Chŏlla du nord en 1985 ; Kangnŭng nongak dans le Kangwŏn en 1985 ; et Imsil Pilbong nongak dans le Chŏlla du nord en 1988.

Et en 2014, le nongak est devenu le 17e Trésor coréen enregistré dans la Liste du Patrimoine culturel immatériel mondial de l’UNESCO.


3. Danses masquées : T’alch’um

Miyalhalmich’um et P’almŏkjungch’um sont deux formes dansées très populaires du t’alch’um (탈춤, théâtre de danse masquée) de Pongsan [30]. Toutefois, l’histoire et la richesse de cet art du spectacle traditionnel ne sauraient se résumer à ces deux performances chorégraphiques.

Le t’alch’um,  à grands traits

Au sens strict du terme, le t’alch’um désigne une dramaturgie masquée (pantomimes et dialogues), avec des scènes ou intermèdes dansés et un accompagnement musical (flûte, cymbales et tambour)  de type yŏmbul, t’aryŏng ou kutkŏri [31]. Traditionnellement, il ne se joue pas dans une salle de théâtre mais en plein air, et commence le soir pour finir à l’aube. Il est inscrit au programme des cérémonies officielles et  interprété au nouvel an lunaire, et il se pratique encore les jours de fêtes traditionnelles.

Ce théâtre populaire tire ses origines des kut célébrés dans les villages et des rites saisonniers agricoles tels que les cérémonies rituelles de la pluie. Lors des rituels d’exorcisme du Festival Kangnŭng Tanoje (강릉단오제) et du Hahoe Pyŏlsin-kut T’alnori (하회별신굿탈놀이), les chamanes célébraient le kut, et les villageois les assistaient en interprétant le théâtre de danse masquée qui devint un élément essentiel du rituel. Indépendamment de ces fonctions religieuses, le t’alch’um pouvait aussi représenter un simple divertissement pour les paysans [32].

Pièce masquée (tŏtpoegi, 덧뵈기)
© 2000 by Cultural Heritage Administration
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-namsadang-nori-00184

Chaque spectacle s’ouvre et se clôt sur une cérémonie rituelle (chamanique et bouddhique), dans le prologue comme dans l’épilogue [33].  Les actes, au nombre de 5 à 9, sont constitués de scènes indépendantes sans dramaturgie fixe, formant une suite de fragments dont le nombre n’est pas fixé, et dont la continuité repose sur le retour des mêmes thèmes et personnages. Les trois classes sociales principales y sont représentées : la classe dirigeante avec les nobles ; la classe aisée avec les moines ; et les pauvres avec le vieillard et sa femme, la prêtresse chamane et les domestiques.

Les danses masquées mettent en scène, sous forme de satires, de farces, et de drames, des personnages types comme le moine apostat, le gentilhomme corrompu, la chamane, les sadang et le mari berné, ou encore l’éternel trio de la femme légitime, de l’époux et de la concubine. Les situations représentent l’oppression des classes populaires mais aussi celle que subissent les femmes, et expriment l’esprit de révolte du peuple contre la tyrannie de la classe dirigeante et l’hypocrisie de la morale conventionnelle. Outre sa portée polémique, le t’alch’um a une fonction cathartique : mettre à distance les frustrations du quotidien et divertir les spectateurs par la comédie et la raillerie, la caricature et la bouffonnerie [34].

Hahoe Pyŏlsin-kut T’alnori, Andong (안동하회별신굿)
© kcultureportal
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyDeV3ahhNc

On distingue quatre grands types régionaux de théâtre de danse masquée : Sande, Pongsan, Hahoe et Yaryu-Okwangdae [35]. C’est celui de Pongsan (Pongsan t’alch’um, 봉산탈춤), natif des environs de Haesŏ dans la province du Hwanghae  qui est le plus structuré, le plus divertissant et le plus artistique de toutes les performances de danse masquée, du fait de la situation économique de la ville. Située sur la route stratégique reliant Séoul et P’yŏngyang, Pongsan possédait en effet l’un des plus grands marchés de la région, et les marchands couvraient les frais des spectacles, quand ils n’y dansaient pas eux-mêmes, puisque leurs affaires prospéraient grâce à un large public [36]. Le théâtre de danse masquée s’est fixé dans des régions prospères (centres agricoles et ports actifs) et s’est développé comme genre urbain grâce à l’appui de la bourgeoisie émergente au 19e siècle  – commerçants et agriculteurs aisés.

Miyalhalmich’um, danse de la vieille femme

Toutes les formes de danse masquée représentent le personnage de Miyalhalmi (미얄할미춤), qui porte aussi le nom de Shinhalmi ou Halmi (vieille femme), avec son vieil époux infidèle. Ce dernier cherche à séduire une jeune femme appelée Kaksi, Somu ou Aesadang [37], et finit par battre sa femme à mort.

Dans certaines versions, le vieillard prend l’apparence d’un moine corruptible (Nojang), et se fait conspuer par Chwibari, le prétendant de Somu, qui se fait lui-même ridiculiser par son serviteur Malttugi, sous les acclamations des spectateurs. La mise en scène varie selon les régions mais, dans tous les cas, la dispute entre le vieux mari infidèle et sa femme s’achève sur la mort brutale de l’épouse, qui vient entériner le triomphe de la misogynie dans  l’idéologie dominante [38].

Dans certaines versions  (les pièces masquées Pyŏlsandae-nori et les danses masquées de la région de Haesŏ),  le chamane entre ensuite en scène pour accomplir un rituel d’exorcisme, en agitant des clochettes ; dans d’autres versions (celles de Yaryu et Okwangdae),  on assiste aux funérailles de la vieille femme et sa bière est emportée au son de chants funèbres [39].

Danse du vieillard et de la vieillarde (미알영감 할미춤)
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaCI2lRWAOI

La version de Ponsang met en scène de manière très crue les antagonismes de sexe, de classes sociales, au sein du couple aussi bien qu’entre l’épouse et sa rivale : le vieillard prononce des répliques très vulgaires où il est question du « con » de sa femme et de « merde ». Surtout, le conflit ne fait qu’exacerber les tensions car le théâtre masqué ne conduit pas à  un dénouement heureux. A la différence des chants du p’ansori (판소리), dans lesquels une femme de basse condition sociale peut se faire épouser par un noble (Dit de Ch’unhyang ,춘향가), et un homme de cœur s’élever socialement (Le Dit de Hŭngbo, 흥보), les conflits apparaissent ici tels qu’ils sont, sans trouver de résolution. En revanche, le public peut participer activement en encourageant les personnages auxquels il s’identifie et en conspuant ceux qu’il juge négatifs [40].

Certaines versions laissent entendre que la vieille femme a échoué à devenir chamane et que cette tentative manquée a influencé son comportement et l’a marginalisée. Ses mouvements sont violents et outranciers : elle se déhanche avec brusquerie et court en tous sens. Son costume mal ajusté expose son corps et sa manière de hausser les épaules et d’agiter les bras montre qu’elle est totalement désinhibée, à l’opposé d’une « honnête femme ». Autrefois, le personnage à la fois comique et tragique de Miyalhalmi était interprété par un homme vêtu en femme, les gestes vulgaires (balancement des hanches et va-et-vient du ventre) étant interdits aux femmes. L’obscénité de cette vieille femme vouée à la mort suscite des sentiments contradictoires, du rire amer à la compassion, et sa danse vigoureuse laisse une forte impression [41].

P’almŏkjungch’um : danse des huit moines indignes

P’almŏkjungch’um (팔목중춤) est l’une des pièces les plus prisées du t’alch’um de Pongsan en ce qu’elle dépeint la corruption des moines bouddhistes de l’époque [42].

Les costumes colorés et le masque grotesque sont impressionnants, surtout lorsqu’ils sont éclairés par le feu. L’entrée et la sortie de scène sont similaires à celles du rituel Narye : les moines entrent l’un après l’autre et chacun chasse le précédent en le frappant au visage avec une branche de pêcher ou de saule, comme dans les rituels d’exorcisme de fin d’année. Les cloches attachées à leurs jambes ont aussi une valeur talismanique [43].

Rigoureuse et énergique, cette danse est typique des régions du nord [44]. Beaucoup de gestes y représentent l’agriculture, la luxure et l’exorcisme. Le point d’orgue de la performance est la séquence dite Sawich’um où le danseur saute en l’air tout en faisant tournoyer ses hansam : le mouvement modŭmsawi qui consiste à rassembler ses pieds avant de bondir est très spectaculaire. Durant la danse, les moines secouent leurs hansam de haut en bas, puis ils fléchissent les genoux et lèvent les jambes avec des mouvements de poignets circulaires, faisant mine d’agiter un fouet pour chasser les esprits maléfiques.

P’almŏkjungch’um (팔목중춤)
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvgWeid8LdU

Danses improvisées : Hŏt’ŭnch’um

Selon Kim Malborg, le terme Hŏt’ŭnch’um (허튼춤) a deux significations : il fait référence à une danse improvisée où les épaules et les bras évoluent librement, au gré de la musique, sans structure formelle, si bien que tout un chacun peut l’interpréter sans y avoir été formé [45]. Il désigne également un type de danse du centre de la Corée qui est exécutée sur le cycle rythmique du t’aryŏng (타령).

De nos jours, le vocable fait référence à des danses impromptues de style libre mais artistiques et professionnelles. Ipch’um (입춤) est une forme de hŏt’ŭnch’um interprétée par des artistes féminins, en intérieur, dans les maisons de kisaeng, tandis que la version exécutée par des hommes en plein air, lors de festivals comme dŭlnorŭm (들놀음, festival dans les champs) ou t’alnori (탈놀이, festival de danse masquée), s’appelle Tŏtbaegich’um.

Ipch’um

Ipch’um (입춤) interprétée par Park Myŏng-ok
© 박명옥 너울예술단
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyvu86-XJ9s&list=RDeFFko4fVA5c&index=3

Le mot « ip » renvoie à la fois à la prononciation coréenne du caractère chinois 立 (« être debout »), et au mot coréen « bouche ». Ipch’um combine l’élégance des danses de cour et la simplicité des danses populaires : sa chorégraphie raffinée est accompagnée par des musiciens mais aussi par le public. Elle peut ainsi être interprétée par tout le monde, car elle requiert moins d’expertise que les autres danses de kisaeng comme Sŭngmu et Salp’urich’um. Elle s’ouvre sur le rythme cyclique du kutkŏri-changdang (굿거리장단) sans formalité précise, et dévoile progressivement la personnalité de la danseuse emportée par la musique. Quand l’émotion atteint son comble, le public entre la danse. Et la danseuse achève sa performance en déroulant un long foulard de sa manche et en frappant un sogo.

Tŏtbaegich’um

Contrepoint masculin de Ipch’um, Tŏtbaegich’um (덧배기춤) est originaire du Kyŏngsang-do et s’interprète en plein air. Elle tire son nom d’une expression signifiant « pousser », « propulser », ou « échapper », et requiert des  mouvements amples et puissants, notamment le « paegi » (배기) qui consiste à se tenir fermement sur la pointe du pied, geste qui est aussi exécuté par les chamanes pour exprimer la maîtrise des esprits.

Paegi (배기), séquence extraite d’un spectacle de Namsadang-nori
© 2008 by Cultural Heritage Administration
Source : https://ich.unesco.org/fr/RL/le-namsadang-nori-00184

Tŏtbaegich’um est aussi une Maedŭpch’um (매듭춤, danse de nœuds), mouvement de « nœud » que le danseur accomplit au terme d’une série de mouvements improvisés, en fléchissant les genoux et avec des gestes amples et virils des épaules. Cette fluidité et cette énergie en font une danse spontanée de style libre que l’on exécute pour le plaisir, et le désir de la rejoindre l’emporte sur toute considération esthétique.

Tŏtbaegich’um de Chinju (진주덧배기춤)
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgvjKxdLsrw

Hallyangmu, danse des nobles prodigues

Cette danse fait référence aux hallyang  (한량), les jeunes aristocrates (yangban) oisifs et prodigues, à l’affût de plaisirs sensuels. Elle a pour origine une intrigue de théâtre impliquant une querelle amoureuse entre des hallyang, un magistrat local de bas rang, un moine et une kisaeng. Ce spectacle était interprété au milieu de séquences acrobatiques exécutées par de jeunes danseurs travestis et juchés sur les épaules de leurs compagnons [46].

La version locale de la région Tongnae de Pusan est une Hŏt’ŭnch’um de style masculin, à mi-chemin entre les madangch’um (마당춤), danses en plein air, et les sarangbangch’um (사랑방춤), danses exécutées dans la chambre de réception des aristocrates. Elle combine les traits des danses folkloriques et des techniques professionnelles. Simple et élégante, elle n’a pas de structure fixe, étant conçue pour le divertissement des yangban dont le danseur porte l’habit : kat et t’opo, avec un éventail.

Hallyangmu, (한량무), danse des nobles prodigues, interprétée au National Gugak Center (국립국악원) de Séoul, le 11 mars 2015.
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk0ShUZP9Sc

Jusqu’à la fin de l’ère Chosŏn, cette danse était l’une des plus populaires en Corée, aux côtés de Sŭngmu et Salp’uri. Mais elle s’est transformée du fait de la disparition progressive des namsadangp’ae. Dans les années 1910, elle était interprétée dans les maisons de kisaeng et dans les festivals villageois. La Hallyangmu que l’on peut voir de nos jours a été chorégraphiée par des danseurs professionnels dans les années 1980. Cette danse est représentative des danses masculines coréennes qui exigent élégance et talent.


Tongnae-Hakch’um, danse de la grue de Tongnae


Tongnae-Hakch’um (동래학춤) est une variante de Tŏtbaegich’um, prisée des hallyang. De ce fait, elle comporte des éléments de Sarangbangch’um (danse des nobles), et peut être rapprochée de Hallyangmu à plusieurs titres.

Tout d’abord, le village de Tongnae, situé près de Pusan, a été durablement marqué par le passage des grues lors de leur migration annuelle, au point d’en conserver la mémoire dans ses toponymes, comme l’a montré Christine J. Loken. Dans les temps anciens, il y avait un grand étang appelé Mudinggi-mot, souvent rempli de grues qui venaient se poser sur un rocher appelé Taejo-am (grand rocher de l’oiseau). Puis l’étang s’est tari et les grues ont cessé de venir à Tongnae [47].

En outre, les sources chaudes de Tongnae attiraient de nombreux hallyang qui venaient danser avec les kisaeng. Les occasions festives y étaient telles que l’on disait : « Chaque fois que quelqu’un ouvre les bras à Tongnae, c’est pour danser ». Et on y dansait beaucoup, à l’extérieur dans les madang-nori (fêtes en extérieur) et en intérieur dans les sarangbang. Selon Christine J. Loken, ce seraient précisément des yangban à la retraite qui auraient créé cette danse à la toute fin de l’ère Chosŏn. C’est ainsi que Tongnae-Hakch’um est devenue l’une des nombreuses danses issues de cette culture du divertissement dans la région. Le premier danseur de Hakch’um dont le nom nous est parvenu est Yi Chu-sŏ (이주서), qui a dansé de 1907 à 1920.

Enfin, le rapprochement entre les deux danses découle de la ressemblance entre la couleur et la silhouette des grues et celles des hallyang : le vêtement blanc à larges manches figure le corps et les ailes de la grue qui se déploient gracieusement, tandis que le chapeau noir évoque sa tête. Cette danse exigeait de l’élégance et des talents artistiques, et l’on appelait myŏngmu ou « grands danseurs » ceux qui les possédaient. Elle se distingue toutefois de la danse de cour appelée Hangmu ou Hakmu, où les interprètes étaient déguisés en grues, car elle n’exprime que métaphoriquement la grâce de l’oiseau.

Elle s’interprète sur le rythme kutkŏri, au son du kkwaenggwari, du ching, du changgu et du puk , avec un battement 4/4 en triplets ou 12/8. Elle comporte dix séquences évoquant le vol, l’atterrissage, la joie de voler, l’étirement, la posture sur une jambe suivie de petits sauts, la quête de nourriture et l’envol. La danse est relativement abstraite, avec deux mouvements récurrents : tŏtbaegi, qui est un saut suivi d’un bond sur le pied droit, tandis que le pied gauche se balance à droite puis s’élance pour opérer une fente dans la  diagonale gauche ; et olimsae qui est un mouvement d’ailes avec les bras. Au cours de la danse, les mains sont souvent ouvertes paumes vers le bas, avec les doigts écartés, à l’instar de la pointe des ailes de grue. A l’origine, c’était une danse en solo, mais elle peut être dansée collectivement.

Tongnae-Hakch’um (동래학춤)
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N88vP_xDMaY

Il en existe aussi une autre version dans le même secteur, créée par des moines du temple Tongdo-sa sur la montagne Yang, et intitulée de ce fait Yangsan Hakch’um(양산학춤). Cette Hakch’um était dansée par des moines revêtus d’une robe grise (changsam, 장삼), d’une étole rouge (kasa, 가사) et d’un kokkal (capuchon), sur un rythme kutkŏri en 14 mouvements. Cette version est plus figurative que la précédente, et de ce fait plus proche de la version de cour. De fait, si le costume demeure abstrait, la pantomime est plus concrète, avec des séquences supplémentaires : vérifier qu’il n’y a pas de danger, rincer la nourriture, se reposer au soleil, et se confronter à une autre grue (la taquiner, la dominer, la nourrir et jouer avec). 

Ces deux danses folkloriques ne sont représentées qu’occasionnellement. Tongnae-Hakch’um  est interprétée seulement pendant le Tongnae-yayu (performances de danse masquée dans les champs). Elle a été désignée Trésor culturel de la ville de Pusan et reçoit un soutien pour sa préservation. Yangsan-Hakch’um est montrée beaucoup plus rarement et ne reçoit pas d’aide officielle. Selon Christine J Loken : « Comme les animaux qu’elles symbolisent, ces danses sont en danger d’extinction et elles ont perdu une part de leur vitalité », du fait de l’avènement des  divertissements de masse et de l’urbanisation du village, si bien que leur survie tient en partie aux organisations culturelles de la ville ou de la nation.

Yangsan-Hakch’um(양산학춤)
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZjkk7xBKAI

5. Danses professionnelles

Ce sont les formes inspirées de danses rituelles et de danses de cour, interprétées par les artistes d’élite au service de  la cour (ye-in, 예인 ), comprenant des  kisaeng, des clowns et des chamanes. A l’exception des kisaeng, ces interprètes sillonnaient le pays pour montrer leurs talents. Même lorsqu’ils s’établissaient dans un endroit particulier, ils vivaient à l’écart des villageois. Leur vie était consacrée au divertissement et leur art, destiné à un public aristocratique, était présenté dans des lieux qui n’accueillaient pas les danses ordinaires [48].

Danses rituelles

La danse chamanique Salp’uri (살풀이) et la danse bouddhique Sŭngmu (승무) sont considérées comme le sommet des danses folkloriques pour leur perfection technique et artistique. Elles sont interprétées par des professionnels.

Une troisième danse, T’aepyŏngmu (태평무), danse de la Grande Paix, est bien plus récente. Elle a été créée il y a plus d’un siècle par des artistes qui s’étaient inspirés de la danse chamanique des récoltes en y ajoutant des traits sophistiqués des danses de cour. Elle fut ensuite perfectionnée par le grand danseur Han Seongjun qu’on appelle le père de la danse folklorique coréenne moderne. Interprétée en solo par un homme ou une femme figurant un roi ou une reine, elle évolue sur le rythme solennel mais animé du chinswae-changdan (진쇠장단) qui est un rythme chamanique de la province du Kyŏnggi. Dans cette danse plus rapide que les autres, l’interprète effectue des rotations du pied entre chaque pas, avec célérité pour suivre le rythme compliqué de la musique. Sans manquer un seul battement, les gestes doivent être énergiques, mais subtils et élégants. Le style combine des traits populaires et aristocratiques, et suggère la grâce et la dignité, avec une pointe de mélancolie. Comme cette danse exprime des vœux pour de paix et de prospérité le roi et la reine ainsi que pour le royaume, seuls les artistes les plus talentueux peuvent relever le défi.

T’aepyŏngmu (태평무) interprétée au National Gugak Center (국립국악원) de Séoul, le 9 avril 2016.
© National Gugak Center
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b_lIBh80V4

Danses de cour

Originaires des danses de cour et des banquets aristocratiques [49], Kŏmmu (검무)  et Sŭngjŏn-mu (승전무)  sont devenues des danses folkloriques professionnelles.

Dans la région éponyme, Chinju-Kŏmmu (진주검무) joue un rôle essentiel dans toutes les célébrations et est aussi exécutée à l’occasion des rites mémoriaux de la célèbre kisaeng Nongae, qui s’était sacrifiée pour le pays durant l’invasion japonaise de 1592. Elle a été préservée dans sa forme archétypale de cour, avec des éléments martiaux et des mouvements spectaculaires (faire voltiger deux épées en l’air), mais s’en éloigne légèrement dans son interprétation. Au lieu de quatre danseuses aux  mains nues, ce sont huit  danseuses vêtues en soldats de l’ère Chosŏn, avec des hansam, qui l’exécutent. Elles forment deux rangées, se tiennent par l’épaule et les hanches, et se déplacent comme si elles combattaient. Puis elles enlèvent les hansam, desserrent les poings et lancent les armes au ciel – mouvement exceptionnel dans une danse du sabre. Après avoir dansé les mains vides pendant un court instant, elles récupèrent leurs sabres dans les deux mains et pivotent. Les armes tournoient pendant que les mains se meuvent d’un côté à l’autre, de haut en bas, au rythme du battement. Puis elles exécutent une série de sauts et de voltes en l’air (yŏnp’ungdae), apothéose du spectacle, avant de former une ligne serrée, où elles font des mouvements de coupe avec les deux sabres, dernière étape avant le salut final.

Chinju-Kŏmmu (진주검무)
Source : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41HO9-NKe9w

Quant à la danse de la victoire Sŭngjŏn-mu, elle a bénéficié d’une reconnaissance en deux temps de la part du gouvernement coréen : la danse spécifique du tambour a été désignée Trésor culturel immatériel n° 21 en 1968 sous le nom de Sŭngjŏn-mu, et la danse du sabre Kŏmmu (검무) a été reconnue en 1987 [50].


Tradition, patrimonialisation et contestation

Certaines de ces danses et coutumes folkloriques ont été réduites à des pratiques clandestines sous l’occupation japonaise (1910-1945), et leur sauvegarde et leur survie ont été mises en péril après la Libération, du fait de l’urbanisation accélérée de la Corée du Sud et de l’occidentalisation croissante de la culture populaire. La plupart d’entre elles ont fait l’objet d’une politique de préservation et ont été enregistrées comme Trésors culturels de la République de Corée des années 1960 aux années 1980, puis inscrites sur la Liste représentative du Patrimoine culturel immatériel de l’UNESCO durant les années 2000-2010. Le gouvernement a aussi désigné des « trésors vivants », détenteurs de formes musicales et dansées, chargés de transmettre cet héritage culturel.

Toutefois, la patrimonialisation de ces traditions folkloriques au cours des soixante dernières années n’allait pas de soi, pour plusieurs raisons. D’une part, figer la forme et  la « muséifier », pour ainsi dire, risquait de briser la vitalité et la spontanéité de ces danses. D’autre part, certains styles avaient déjà évolué et s’étaient occidentalisés sous l’occupation japonaise, à l’instar de la « New Dance ». En outre, les tentatives d’innovation ou de renouveau de la tradition dans la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle ont pu paraître suspectes aux tenants de la tradition, et sujettes à corrompre son authenticité. Enfin, le monopole exercé par les instances gouvernementales sur ces traditions a longtemps été perçu comme une dépossession et une mainmise politique sur les traditions populaires. Et c’est ainsi que la population étudiante, devenue une puissance démographique et sociale dès les années 1960, s’est (ré)approprié certains de ces arts vivants pour mieux contester la dictature. Réactivant leur force de frappe idéologique, elle les a mis en scène jusqu’à la fin des années 1980 pour revendiquer la démocratie.

De la première loi de protection du patrimoine culturel en 1962 à la ratification de la Convention pour la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel immatériel en 2003 [51], la préservation de cet héritage culturel a obéi à différents enjeux nationalistes, politiques et identitaires et a pu susciter maintes polémiques.

Florence Codet, le 14 juin 2020



Notes

[1] The Korea Foundation, Korean dance, pure emotion and energy, Seoul selection, 2013.

[2] Kim Malborg et Lee Jean Young (trad.), Korean dance, Seoul, Ewha Womans University Press, 2005.

[3] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit. Le développement qui suit est extrait de la même source.

[4] The Korea Foundation, Korean dance, pure emotion and energy, op. cit.

[5] Im Tong-gwŏn et Mr and Mrs Kim Se-jung (trad.), « Folk Plays », dans Traditional performing arts of Korea, Korean national commission for UNESCO, 1983.

[6] Han Man-yong, « Korean dance repertories », dans Korean National Commission for UNESCO, Korean dance, theater, and cinema, Seoul, Si-sa-yong-o-sa Publishers, 1983.

[7] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[8] Im Tong-gwŏn et Mr and Mrs Kim Se-jung (trad.), « Folk Plays », dans Traditional performing arts of Korea, op. cit.

[9] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[10] Kim Yang-gon, « Farmers Music and Dance », dans Korean dance, theater, and cinema, op. cit.

[11] Kim Yang-gon, « Farmers Music and Dance », dans Korean dance, theater, and cinema, op. cit.

[12] Chang Sa-hun et Han Man-yŏng (trad.), « Farmers’ Band Music », dans Traditional performing arts of Korea, op. cit. Sauf indication contraire, le développement qui suit est extrait de la même source.

[13] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[14] Ibid.

[15] Chang Sa-hun, « Farmers’ Band Music », art. cit.

[16] King Eleanor, « Reflections on Korean dance », dans Korean dance, theater, and cinema, op. cit.

[17] Han Man-yong, « Korean dance repertories », art. cit. 

[18] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[19] Ibid.

[20] D’après Kim Malborg, Sogo-ch’um recouvre deux formes : Ch’aesang-sogoch’um qui est prépondérante dans la partie orientale du Chŏlla-do, et Kokkalch’um (고깔춤, danse du capuchon), performance dans laquelle l’interprète de kokkal-sogo porte un capuchon orné de pompons en papier et danse seulement avec un sogo. Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[21] King Eleanor, « Reflections on Korean dance », art. cit.

[22] Tout ce développement est extrait de Chang Sa-hun, « Farmers’ Band Music »,  art. cit.

[23] Ibid. Tout ce développement est extrait de la même source.

[24] Ibid.

[25] Kim Yang-gon, « Farmers Music and Dance », art cit.

[26] Ces spectacles comprennent de la musique folklorique (p’ungmul, 풍물), une pièce masquée (tŏtpoegi, 덧뵈기), du théâtre de marionnettes (tŏlmi, 덜미) et de la magie, ainsi que maintes acrobaties : funambulisme (ŏrŭm, 어름), sauts périlleux (salp’an, 살판)  et tours de plats en équilibre (pŏna, 버나). Voir Jeon Kyung-wook, Traditional performing arts of Korea, Seoul, Korea foundation, 2008.

[27] Chang Sa-hun, « Farmers’ Band Music », art. cit. Sauf indication contraire, tout ce développement est extrait de la même source.

[28] Kim Yang-gon, « Farmers Music and Dance », art. cit.

[29] Wikipédia, article “P’ungmul” : https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pungmul

[30] En fonction des régions, le théâtre de danse masquée est aussi appelé sande (pièce jouée sur une scène sande, kamyŏn-nori (가면놀이, jeu de masques), kamyŏn-kŭk (가면극, théâtre de masques), dŭl-nori (들놀이, jeu dans les champs) ou okwangdae (오광대,les cinq pitres). Voir Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[31] Chong Pyŏng-hi, Danses masquées et jeux de marionnettes en Corée, Paris, Publications orientalistes de France, 1975.

[32] The Korea Foundation, Korean dance, pure emotion and energy, op. cit.

[33] Chong Pyŏng-hi, Danses masquées et jeux de marionnettes en Corée, op. cit. Le développement suivant est extrait de la même source.

[34] The Korea Foundation, Korean dance, pure emotion and energy, op. cit.

[35] Chong Pyŏng-hi, Danses masquées et jeux de marionnettes en Corée, op. cit.

[36] Cho Dong-il et Lee Kyong-hee (trad.), Korean mask dance, Seoul, Ewha Womans University Press, 2005.

[37] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[38] Cho Dong-il, Korean mask dance, op. cit.

[39] Jeon Kyung-wook, Traditional performing arts of Korea, op. cit.

[40] Ibid.

[41] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[42] Ibid.

[43] Jeon Kyung-wook, Traditional performing arts of Korea, op. cit.

[44] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[45] Ibid. Le développement qui suit est extrait de la même source.

[46] Ibid.

[47] Christine J. Loken signale également les toponymes suivants : une colline, évoquant  la forme d’une grue, en porte le nom Haksudae (le cou de la grue), Haksodae (le nid de la grue), Ma-annyŏng (le corps de la grue), Tongjang-dae (l’aile gauche de la grue), Sŏjang-dae (l’aile droite de la grue). Et un village situé à proximité de l’étang s’appelait Hwangsae-al (l’œuf du grand oiseau). Ces dénominations sont apparues pour la première fois dans des chroniques de la fin des années 1860, lorsque le gouverneur de Tongnae, Chŏn Hyŏn-dŏk, qui procédait à l’établissement d’une base militaire, releva le nom de Haksu-dae comme lieu de production de l’artillerie. Pour tout le développement qui suit, voir Loken Christine J., « Crane dances in Korea », dans Korean dance, theater, and cinema, op. cit.

[48] The Korea Foundation, Korean dance, pure emotion and energy, op. cit. Le développement qui suit est extrait de la même source.

[49] Kim Ch’ŏn-hŭng et Heyman Alan C., « Korean traditional dance », Korean dance, theater, and cinema, op. cit.

[50] Kim Malborg, Korean dance, op. cit.

[51] Bae, Jung-sook, « Le rôle du patrimoine dans la construction identitaire et géopolitique de la Corée du Sud », Ethnologies, 39 (1), 2017. Article consultable en ligne : https://doi.org/10.7202/1051058ar

Bibliographie et webographie

Bae, Jung-sook, « Le rôle du patrimoine dans la construction identitaire et géopolitique de la Corée du Sud », Ethnologies, 39 (1), 2017. Article consultable en ligne : https://doi.org/10.7202/1051058ar

Chang Sa-hun et Han Man-yŏng (trad.), « Farmers’ Band Music », dans Traditional performing arts of Korea, Korean national commission for UNESCO, 1983.

Cho Dong-il et Lee Kyong-hee (trad.), Korean mask dance, Seoul, Ewha Womans University Press, 2005.

Chong Pyŏng-hi, Danses masquées et jeux de marionnettes en Corée, Paris, Publications orientalistes de France, 1975.

Han Man-yŏng et Mr and Mrs Kim Se-jung (trad.), « Introduction », dans Traditional performing arts of Korea, Korean national commission for UNESCO, 1983.

Im Tong-gwŏn et Mr and Mrs Kim Se-jung (trad.), « Folk Plays », dans Traditional performing arts of Korea, Korean national commission for UNESCO, 1983.

Jeon Kyung-wook, Traditional performing arts of Korea, Seoul, Korea foundation, 2008.

Kim Ch’ŏn-hŭng et Heyman Alan C., « Korean traditional dance », dans Korean National Commission for UNESCO, Korean dance, theater, and cinema, Seoul, Si-sa-yong-o-sa Publishers, 1983. 

Kim Malborg et Lee Jean Young (trad.), Korean dance, Seoul, Ewha Womans University Press, 2005.

Kim Yang-gon, « Farmers Music and Dance », dans Korean dance, theater, and cinema, Seoul, Si-sa-yong-o-sa Publishers, 1983.

King Eleanor, « Reflections on Korean dance », dans Korean dance, theater, and cinema, Seoul, Si-sa-yong-o-sa Publishers, 1983.

The Korea Foundation, Korean dance, pure emotion and energy, Seoul selection, 2013.

UNESCO, Intangible Cultural Heritage, pour l’illustration liminaire de l’article : Kanggang-sullae (강강술래) © 2004, by National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage  : https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/ganggangsullae-00188

Wikipédia, article “P’ungmul” : https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pungmul

Laisser un commentaire